Best Apologies of the Week
Including a young stock whiz who wasn't quite
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 20, 2014 11:59 AM CST
Updated Dec 20, 2014 2:30 PM CST
   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – Somebody somewhere always seems to be apologizing for something. Five favorites from the week:

  • You are not accepted: “Earlier today, you may have received an email from us with the subject line: Embrace the YES! Please note that this email was sent in error. ... We regret this technical mistake and any confusion it may have caused." — Johns Hopkins to about 300 high school seniors who were mistakenly told they'd been accepted to the school. Read more.

  • Not so rich: "I am sorry for any who may have been hurt by this story. ... While I’ve had really successful simulated trades, my financial prowess has not been practiced and fine-tuned in the real world." — Mohammed Islam, a Stuyvesant High student who claimed to be a stock market whiz who'd made tens of millions. Which then led to an apology by New York magazine: "We were duped. Our fact-checking process was obviously inadequate; we take full responsibility and we should have known better. New York apologizes to our readers." Read more.
  • Cheap banker: “I have always recognized that what I did was foolish. I have apologized to all concerned and reiterate that apology publicly today.” — Former BlackRock exec Jonathan Burrows of London, a very rich man who dodged train fares on his daily commute for years. Read more.
  • Capitol Hill: "The senator acknowledged that a number of his colleagues had to unexpectedly change their weekend plans, and he apologized to them for inconveniencing their personal schedules. That was not his intention." — A spokesperson for Ted Cruz, after his parliamentary tactics messed up colleagues' free time. Read more.
  • Let it go, please: "A year ago, I'd meet people who, when they found out who I was, they'd say, 'Oh, we love the songs! We sing them all the time.' Now they're like, 'Yep, we're still listening to those songs.' I've gone from, 'Thank you,' to, 'Sorry!'" — Frozen director Jennifer Lee. Read more.

 

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
25%
4%
4%
11%
0%
57%