Jeb Bush: 'I Know We Can Fix This'
Former Florida governor declares run for US president
By Neal Colgrass,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 15, 2015 5:04 PM CDT
Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush formally joins the race for president with a speech at Miami Dade College, Monday, June 15, 2015, in Miami.   (AP Photo/David Goldman)

(Newser) – Jeb Bush made it official today: He's now the eleventh declared Republican running for president of the United States. "We will take Washington—the static capital of this dynamic country—out of the business of causing problems," he told a supportive crowd at Miami Dade College, per Politico. "We will get back on the side of free enterprise and free people." Pointing to his two terms as Florida governor, the 62-year-old said that "I know we can fix this. Because I’ve done it." Among the highlights:

  • "Not a one of us [candidates] deserves the job by right of resume, party, seniority, family, or family narrative," he said, apparently distancing himself from the Bush lineage. "It’s nobody’s turn."
  • Guess that means it's not Hillary Clinton's, either: "I, for one, am not eager to see what another four years would look like under that kind of leadership," he said, per the Hill. "The presidency should not be passed on from one liberal to the next."
  • He also criticized the Obama years, referring to a "phone-it-in foreign policy" and dismissing Obama's Cuba policy: "We don't need a glorified tourist to go to Havana in support of a failed Cuba," Bush said.
  • He also touted the importance of school choice, despite his earlier backing of Common Core standards. "Every parent should have the right to send their child to a better school—public, private, or charter," he said, adding that the government "should have nothing to do with setting school standards."
  • And he set "some bold goals" for a Jeb Bush presidency, Politico reports, saying he would aim for 4% domestic growth each year and energy security for the country within 5 years.
  • Overall, Bush presented himself "as a counterpoint to a Republican Party that has struggled to connect with minority voters" in the last two presidential elections, the New York Times says. He also promised to stick with his principles, "an implicit attack" on GOP candidates who have adjusted their views to suit core conservatives.

See a video Bush offered up last night, or read about apparent troubles in his campaign.
 

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