5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week
Including one of note to anyone who's ever been involved in a breakup
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Aug 8, 2015 5:30 AM CDT
A statue of David and Goliath. Archaeologists have found the gate of Goliath's town.   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – Intriguing archaeological finds highlight the week's list of discoveries:

  • Ancient Mystery Monolith Found Off Sicily's Coast: Archaeologists have made quite the find off the coast of Sicily: a monolith that dates back about 10,000 years. It's broken in two now and on its side, but the block would have stood nearly 40 feet tall in its heyday. It clearly required engineering skill to make, which is why its age is so intriguing to scientists.
  • Archaeologists Find the Gate to Goliath's Hometown: An archaeological dig now in its 20th year has uncovered the entrance gate to Gath, the ancient Biblical city of the Philistines and onetime home of the giant Goliath. Another find makes clear that Gath was of huge importance.

  • This Massive Site Might Put Stonehenge to Shame: You think Stonehenge is impressive? Archaeologists in Britain are excavating a monument 10 times larger, though it appears to the naked eye to be little more than farmland. A henge is a circular earthwork, and the one in question is Marden Henge, which sits a few miles north of Stonehenge in Wiltshire. Researchers think answers lie beneath the valley between these places.
  • Horses and Humans Share Lots of Looks: Scientists have taken a long, hard long at our equine pals and determined that horses have 17 distinct looks of their own. That's three more than chimps use, one more than dogs, and only 10 fewer than humans. Researchers have a theory on why horses fare better than other animals on this front.
  • Women Are Hurt More by Breakups, But ... Ladies, we have good and bad news on the breakup front. The good news: You'll probably get over the split faster than your male ex. The bad news: You'll feel more pain in the meantime. There's even an evolutionary explanation.
Click to read about more discoveries, including how fish are adapting to outsmart fishermen in a sense.