Trump's Triumph? What to Watch on Super Tuesday
Both front-runners could be unstoppable after today
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Mar 1, 2016 3:48 AM CST
Updated Mar 1, 2016 6:33 AM CST
A member of the audience waits to shake hands with Donald Trump as he greets people after speaking at a rally at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Ga., on Monday.   (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

(Newser) – Super Tuesday is upon us—and it could be the day that changes the Republican Party forever. With 11 states holding GOP primaries and caucuses, rival candidates are doing their best to dent Donald Trump, but the party establishment fears that the time when his candidacy could be stopped is already in the past. On the Democratic side, meanwhile, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will battle for 11 states plus American Samoa, and analysts say it will require victory in a few close-run contests for Sanders to keep his candidacy afloat. A roundup of coverage:

  • FiveThirtyEight has a detailed guide to every state voting in the Republican and Democratic contests, including poll numbers—which suggest both front-runners are headed toward huge wins.
  • With Trump poised to win up to 10 states, Politico looks at how his momentum has split Republican leaders, and at what Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz plan to do in the days ahead.
  • The Wall Street Journal looks at why Massachusetts will be a must-win for Bernie Sanders.

  • The AP has a guide to when results will start rolling in. Caucus states Minnesota, Colorado, and Alaska may experience more hiccups than others.
  • Fox News takes a closer look at the states where victory will be most important, including Texas, the biggest prize and possibly Cruz's only win.
  • It's also primary day for Democrats living overseas. The AP talks to voters in New Zealand, where Super Tuesday arrived first.
  • Politico breaks down five numbers it says will define Super Tuesday, including Rubio's share of the vote in northern Virginia.
  • The Washington Post reports on Sanders' jabs at Clinton on the eve of Super Tuesday. He has vowed to stay in the race until all 50 states have voted.
  • Peter Beinart at the Atlantic has three reasons why liberals in states that allow non-Republicans to vote in GOP primaries should give up their chance to vote for Sanders or Clinton and cast a ballot for Marco Rubio.
  • Today is do or die for Cruz, according to the National Review, which explains how he managed to paint himself into this corner.
  • The New York Times looks at the GOP's revamped delegate selection, designed to "turbocharge the campaign of a front-runner"—and at how it could help Trump wrap things up very quickly.