What's Next for Clinton, Sanders
The road ahead for Sanders doesn't look easy
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Mar 2, 2016 1:28 AM CST
Bernie Sanders speaks during a primary night rally in Essex Junction, Vt., on Super Tuesday.   (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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(Newser) – Is Hillary Clinton now inevitable? She cruised to victory in seven Super Tuesday states plus American Samoa, while Bernie Sanders prevailed in four states and came a very close second in Massachusetts. Here's how analysts see the Democratic race developing in the weeks ahead:

  • The race is all but over, according to Chris Cillizza at the Washington Post, who points to Clinton's big margin of victory in the Super Tuesday states that award the most delegates. "Clinton has a death grip on the Democratic nomination," he writes. "The only question is how and when she and her team negotiate a peace with Sanders."

  • Sanders has been unable to gain much support from minority voters and Clinton has now pulled too far ahead to be caught, according to Evan Halper at the Los Angeles Times. For Sanders to win now, he would have to win more than 60% of the remaining delegates—and that's before all the superdelegates supporting Clinton are added to the equation.
  • The wins in Minnesota, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Vermont give Sanders the rationale he needs to continue, writes Kyle Cheney at Politico. The next states to vote are Nebraska, Kansas, and Maine, which are all Sanders-friendly states, but they may not be enough for him to launch a comeback.
  • With the win in Massachusetts proving that she "can best her left-wing rival on his home turf in the Northeast," Clinton is now beginning her general election campaign, writes Niall Stanage at the Hill, who notes that she barely mentioned Sanders in her victory speech. Sanders has enough cash to soldier on, he writes, "but the idea of him as the nominee looks less plausible with every big night in the race."