5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week
Including a surprising sibling story
By Newser Editors, Newser Staff
Posted Mar 12, 2016 5:31 AM CST
Some of the 12 (unhidden) Apostles.   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – A potential breakthrough regarding miscarriages and "drowned" rock formations make the list:

  • Scientists Find Cause of Repeat Miscarriages: Researchers have been searching for the cause of multiple miscarriages for decades, and now they say they know what it is: a lack of stem cells in the lining of the womb. And the discovery brings hopeful news.
  • 2-Year-Old Twins Found to Have Different Dads: A Vietnamese couple had their 2-year-old twins genetically tested after family members kept harping about how different the children looked, and what they discovered was quite the surprise: Same mom, different dads. The window in which this can happen is pretty small.

  • Australia Finds 'Drowned Apostles': One of Australia's most beloved attractions is its 12 Apostles—ancient rock formations poking out of the waves off Victoria's coast. Scientists are now in awe at a recent discovery of some neighbors: five "Drowned Apostles" in a linear formation, hiding 160 feet underwater. They have a theory as to how these structures bucked the odds and survived.
  • Your Size Predicts How Much You'll Earn: Bad news for short men and overweight women: You have "reduced chances in life" when it comes to income, education, and job prospects, per a new study. Researchers analyzed genetic variants related to height and BMI in 120,000 Brits and settled on some fairly specific figures.
  • 'V' signs may identify terrorists: Trying to ID masked terrorists appearing in propaganda or execution videos is one of counterterrorism's biggest obstacles. But a researcher at Jordan's Mutah University and his team think they've found one physical tell that could prove invaluable: the victory sign formed by making the letter "V" with one's index and middle fingers. Of course, terrorists may figure out an easy way around it.
Click to read about more discoveries.