Trump: Clinton Is Both 'Weak' and a 'Monster'
Looks like he's making peace with GOP bigwigs
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Aug 6, 2016 11:01 AM CDT
Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Friday, Aug. 5, 2016, in Green Bay, Wis.   (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
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(Newser) – Donald Trump's campaign denied that GOP bigwigs were planning to stage an "intervention" earlier in the week—but there was certainly a more GOP-friendly Trump on display at a Friday night rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin. After finally endorsing Paul Ryan, Trump also offered belated endorsements of John McCain—saying he holds him in the "highest esteem" for "his service to our country in uniform and in public office"—and New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte, CNN reports. He also focused his attacks on Hillary Clinton, the Hill reports. "In one way, she's a monster," he said. "In another way, she's a weak person. She's actually not strong enough to be president." In other coverage:

  • Trump, apparently keen to move on from a week widely seen as terrible for his campaign, even addressed the controversy over having a crying baby removed from one of his rallies, saying he had only been joking, the New York Times reports. "The baby that had a voice that was superior to Pavarotti," he told the Green Bay crowd. "I want to sponsor that baby."

  • In a CNN interview Friday, Ohio Gov. John Kasich said he doesn't know how he will vote this November—but Trump still has a long way to go to get his support. "I wish that I could be fully enthusiastic. I can't be," he told Jake Tapper. "So I don't know what's going to happen at the end." He also admitted that he avoided the GOP convention in Cleveland because he thought it would be "inappropriate" to attend when he wasn't going to endorse the nominee.
  • Politico looks at recent poll numbers and concludes that Trump is now definitely the underdog—he's further behind Clinton than John McCain, Mitt Romney, or John Kerry were behind their rivals at this stage of their campaigns—but he appears ready to fight back with a big push for working-class white voters in Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin
  • The Washington Post reports on a group of voters that confuse some in both parties: Those who voted for Obama in 2008 and plan to vote for Trump in 2016. They say they are being completely consistent: They voted for change in 2008 and since there wasn't enough of it, they're once again choosing the candidate who promises to shake things up.
  • In a series of tweets on Saturday, Trump attacked Clinton over her claim to have "short-circuited" while answering questions about her private email server. "Anybody whose mind "SHORT CIRCUITS" is not fit to be our president! Look up the word "BRAINWASHED," he tweeted.

 

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