More States Move to Ban Powdered Booze
Kids could 'sprinkle it on top of their Wheaties'
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 17, 2014 4:39 AM CST
Colorado Republican Rep. JoAnn Windholz plans a bill to ban Palcohol.   (AP Photo/Colorado House Republicans)
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(Newser) – The dangers of powdered alcohol are not to be sniffed at, according to lawmakers who are trying to ban the product before it hits the shelves. Alaska, Delaware, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Vermont have already outlawed booze in powder form, and Colorado is the latest to discuss a ban on "Palcohol," whose creator calls it a convenient product that will only be sold in liquor stores, reports Colorado Public Radio. New York, Ohio, and Minnesota are also considering bans. The company, which says each serving of powder that can be added to water is the equivalent of a shot of rum or vodka, doesn't expect Palcohol to be in stores before spring 2015. It's still awaiting approval from tax authorities, but the FDA says it doesn't have any legal basis to block its sale.

"I think being proactive and jumping out in front of the problem is probably the right thing to do," the director of the County Sheriffs of Colorado tells the AP. "It really doesn't have any place in our society, powdered alcohol. We have enough problems with the liquid kind." He also warns that kids could "sprinkle it on top of their Wheaties for breakfast." A GOP state lawmaker has promised to bring in a powder ban bill early next year. On its website, Palcohol suggests the product could be used by thirsty hikers and other outdoor enthusiasts and says it has medical, manufacturing, and even military applications. It also dismisses suggestions people might snort the product, saying the alcohol is painful to snort—and the amount of powder required to make a drink is big enough that it would take an hour to snort a single shot. (Also a thing? Powdered wine.)
 

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