employers

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40% of Employers to Hike Health Plan Costs Next Year

Another 8% to drop coverage entirely, survey reveals

(Newser) - Many Americans are happy with their employer-sponsored health care plans and eager to keep them, but they won't be keeping them at the current price, the Washington Post reports. In a survey released yesterday, some 40% of employers said they expect to increase the amount their employees paid for health...

Nearly Half of Employers Screen Social Media Profiles

HR departments use Facebook, MySpace as source of information on candidates

(Newser) - It’s becoming increasingly likely that a prospective employer will check your Facebook, MySpace or LinkedIn profile, Mashable reports. A recent survey found that 45% of human-resource departments search the social-media profiles of prospective employees, with another 11% planning to institutionalize a social-networking screen in the near future. And recruiters...

CBO: Dems' Health Plans Will Raise Costs

'Maybe what he should do is run for Congress,' snaps Reid

(Newser) - The health care reform bills being pushed by House Democrats and the Senate health panel would not cut costs as advertised, says the director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. In fact, Douglas Elmendorf believes they would raise costs, the Washington Post reports. “We do not see the sort...

Job Hunters Take Pitch to TV

TV ads newest way to reach employers

(Newser) - This may be the age of YouTube, but good, old-fashioned TV still has the edge in one field: job hunting, the AP reports. Unemployed professionals are turning to the original tube to reach employers through television commercials—proving that “TV, in spite of all the technology, is still the...

Surfing on Company Time Boosts Productivity

May we suggest Newser.com?

(Newser) - If your boss catches you reading this article, don’t sweat it. A little recreational internet use on the job makes for more productive employees, according to a new Australian study. The study surveyed 300 people, 70% of whom engaged in a little WILB—“workplace Internet leisure browsing.”...

Sinking 401(k)s Raise Debate on How to Save

Accounts tumble by up to 11%, but backers still love them

(Newser) - Tumbling stock markets have cracked open the piggy bank that many Americans use to store retirement savings—401(k) accounts—sparking fresh debate about how best to save money, the Washington Post reports. Supporters argue that 401(k)s offer bigger rewards than traditional pensions, which are less exposed to market turbulence. But...

US Health Costs to Rise 5.7% in '09

Insurance costs go up for 4th straight year

(Newser) - Get ready for another increase in co-pays and deductibles. A survey being released today found that 59% of employers intend to keep down rising health care costs by sharing them with workers. Costs will go up by an average 5.7% for both parties next year, rising faster than inflation...

NRA Guilty of Poor Aim in Fla. Guns-at-Work Case
NRA Guilty of Poor Aim in
Fla. Guns-at-Work Case
OPINION

NRA Guilty of Poor Aim in Fla. Guns-at-Work Case

Second Amendment does not trump property rights for private companies

(Newser) - Florida’s "take your guns to work” law seems like it’s upholding the right to bear arms (which is what the National Rifle Association wants us to believe), but in fact it’s a violation of property rights, Steve Chapman argues in Reason. The law allows permit-holders to...

Big Brother Boss Turns Eye on Home Workers

Employers take screenshots and photos

(Newser) - Think working out of a home office means wearing your jammies and watching YouTube? Not unless you want the boss to see what you watch in your Mickey Mouse PJs. As telecommuting rises, employers are tracking their workers by taking screen snapshots, recording keystrokes, and even taking pictures of workers...

Cash-Strapped Businesses Battle Immigration Crackdown

Some states now responding to employers' need for low-cost labor

(Newser) - As state and federal authorities crack down on illegal immigration, businesses are fighting back, the New York Times reports. Employers, stung by aggressive new measures that would revoke the licenses of those found to have hired illegals, say their very existence is threatened. A few states are responding to the...

Many Retirees Will Have Less Than They Think

Economist compares direct-benefit to direct-contribution plans

(Newser) - Many employees will enter retirement with a much smaller income than they expect, the Economist reports. By 2014, the amount of money saved in direct-contribution retirement plans—ie 401Ks—will outpace than the amount saved in old-fashioned direct-benefit plans. But workers set contributions to their DC schemes at lower levels...

Big Unions Cut Secret Deals With Employers

Confidential pacts speed organizing, but raise rights questions

(Newser) - Two of America's biggest unions have made secret deals with major employers that let the companies choose where workers can organize and how many of them can do so, the Wall Street Journal reports. The unions, SEIU and Unite Here, say the confidential agreements have gotten more workers into unions,...

Rule Threatens Retiree Health Benefits

New regulation allows bosses to dump health insurance for those over 65

(Newser) - A new policy will let employers cut or drop medical benefits for retirees once they pass the age of 65 and qualify for Medicare. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has created a specific exemption from age discrimination rules that will allow employers to create two classes of retirees with different...

No-Frills Chain Has CEO to Match
No-Frills Chain Has CEO
to Match

No-Frills Chain Has CEO to Match

Costco's Jim Sinegal wins loyalty of his workers, customers

(Newser) - With his hot-dog lunches, second-hand desk, and disdain of ties, Jim Sinegal of Costco is not your typical Fortune 500 CEO. But the 71-year-old's steadfast devotion to the company's no-frills business plan and generosity to employees has helped make Costco a formidable player in the retail business, writes the Seattle ...

Employees Go Lean for Green
Employees Go Lean for Green

Employees Go Lean for Green

Forget the vegetables: people lose weight to fatten their wallets, study finds

(Newser) - A new study shows that paying people to lose weight works, a possible boon to employers and employees beset by the high costs of obesity. Researchers separated participants, who weren’t given a specific weight loss program, into three groups—two of which would be paid either $7 or $14...

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