scientific study

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Scientists Turn Up Stunning 'Snot Palaces'

They do more with 4 inches than you'd expect

(Newser) - Master builders of the sea construct the equivalent of a complex five-story house that protects them from predators and funnels and filters food for them—all from snot coming out of their heads. And when these delicate mucus homes get clogged, the tadpole-looking critters—called giant larvaceans—build a new... More »

Mystery Solved: Why These Frogs Have See-Through Skin

Glass frog's translucent legs help it hide from predators

(Newser) - Scientists say they finally understand why the glass frog has see-through skin: it's camouflage—just not in the way most other tree frogs do it. An international team of scientists wondered why the glass frogs found in Central and South America have partially translucent skin—with intestines and a... More »

Hurricanes Are No Longer the Same

A new study confirms what scientists have predicted

(Newser) - Are hurricanes getting worse? That's what climate models have long predicted, and now there's evidence: A new study finds that hurricanes have indeed grown more powerful in recent decades, LiveScience reports. "The trend is there and it is real," lead study author James Kossin tells the... More »

Huge Alaskan Tsunami Could Be Imminent

A glacier is retreating, and scientists say a massive wave will eventually result

(Newser) - Scientists are warning that the sudden collapse of an Alaskan slope currently being propped up by a retreating glacier could trigger a catastrophic tsunami hundreds of feet high. "It could happen anytime, but the risk just goes way up as this glacier recedes," researcher Anna Liljedahl tells the... More »

'Best Chance' for Coronavirus Cure? Might Be This Llama

Scientists are trying 'antibody therapies' for near-term coronavirus cure

(Newser) - Llamas are known as sociable animals with pleasantly soft wool—and now, a possible cure for the coronavirus. Scientists say llamas and alpacas at a research farm in Belgium are producing special antibodies that show promise in stopping the coronavirus, the Washington Post reports. A new scientific paper says these... More »

Home Isolation 'Might Not Be' Right for Everyone

Study also says coronavirus droplets can really fly

(Newser) - The six-foot distance rule might not be enough after all. A new study out of China suggests we could all step back an extra seven feet to avoid coronavirus droplets that hang in the air for hours, AFP reports. Led by researchers from the Academy of Military Medical Sciences in... More »

In Phenomenon Seen Across Species, the Ladies Have It

Female mammals typically live longer, likely owing to genetics

(Newser) - It's not just in human populations that females tend to live longer than males. The same trend has been seen in mammals such as elephants, lions, and orcas, according to a new study. Indeed, demographic data for 134 populations of 101 mammalian species shows females outlive males in 60%... More »

Got a Nagging Cough? Study Has Good News

Clinical trial finds new drug could help those with chronic unexplained cough

(Newser) - As many as 10% of adults around the world have a chronic, unexplained cough—and now they might finally get some relief. There's currently no effective treatment for a cough that has no clear cause, but UK researchers say a clinical trial of a potential new drug called Gefapixant... More »

Gulf Oil Spill Was Bigger, Badder Than We Thought

Satellite imagery couldn't detect toxic oil beneath ocean surface: researchers

(Newser) - The Deepwater Horizon spill was worse than thought, thanks to "invisible and toxic oil," say researchers. Ahead of the 10th anniversary of the Gulf of Mexico disaster, a study out of the University of Miami suggests the spread of the spill was 30% larger than satellite data indicated,... More »

Star Is Seen Dragging Space-Time With It

Looks like Albert Einstein nailed this one

(Newser) - Rack up another one for Albert Einstein. New research on a pair of stars confirms a prediction from Einstein's general theory of relativity—that a spinning object will drag space-time right along with it, Science Alert reports. Astrophysicists have spotted the effect, known as "frame dragging," in... More »

Our Oceans Aren't Just Bad. They're 2019 Bad

Last year was the warmest on record for oceans

(Newser) - A new ocean study is bad news for anyone living on planet Earth, the Guardian reports. Researchers found that world oceans reached their warmest level in 2019, amid 5 years that were the warmest 5 for oceans on record and 10 years that were warmest 10. "We found that... More »

Scientists Stumble On World's Oldest Forest

Scientists find ancient trees just north of Manhattan

(Newser) - Earth's three trillion trees do a lot for us—make life possible, really—but how did they ever get started? Well, look no further than New York state. Scientists say they've found the world's oldest known forest in an abandoned quarry a couple hours north of Manhattan,... More »

West Coast Waters Hide Alarming Secret

New study finds startling coastal acidification

(Newser) - Those majestic West Coast waters? They hold a secret, and some of our most valuable fisheries could hang in the balance. A new study says US Pacific coastal waters are acidifying at twice the global ocean average, posing a major threat to fisheries there, the Sacramento Bee reports. "California... More »

Royal Family's Doom Could Be Seen in Their Faces

The Habsburgs' big jaws are linked to inbreeding

(Newser) - Ever notice the "Habsburg jaw"? The distinct protrusion may have been caused by inbreeding—or so says a new study that revisits the topic of how the ruling family went extinct, LiveScience reports. "The Habsburg dynasty was one of the most influential in Europe, but became renowned... More »

Life Endures Pretty Much Anywhere—Except Here

The landscape at Dallol is forbidding to say the least

(Newser) - Just because a planet has liquid, don't expect life there—at least according to a new study that delved into one of Earth's most toxic environments, CNN reports. Scientists took samples from the creepy, multicolored pools on a volcanic crater in Ethiopia, and found not one living thing.... More »

Scientist Who Led Stunning Meat Study Had Industry Ties

But Bradley Johnston says that makes no difference

(Newser) - A head-spinning new study says red meat might not be unhealthy—but the lead author's past ties to the food and meat industry are raising a few eyebrows, the New York Times reports. "Journals require disclosure, and it is always better to disclose fully, if for no other... More »

Blood Test Could Get Rid of 'Coin-Tossing' on Alzheimer's

Researchers excited about test that detects beta-amyloid protein, an indicator of disease

(Newser) - It's not easy to diagnose Alzheimer's: With doctors able to make that pronouncement based only on limited information such as patient and family interviews and mental acuity tests, the accuracy rate of such a conclusion hovers between 50% and 60%—"about the same as tossing a coin,... More »

Insects Feel Chronic Pain, Research Suggests

Scientists seek non-opioid ways to help patients

(Newser) - Much like humans, insects can face chronic pain after an injury has healed, Australian research has shown. The findings could lead to help for people dealing with chronic pain. "We knew that insects could sense pain," said Greg Neely of the University of Sydney , per Cosmos , "but... More »

Life-Changing News for Quadriplegics

New technique revives hope for people with paralysis

(Newser) - A ray of hope for those with complete paralysis: Australian surgeons have devised a way to restore tactile skills like brushing teeth, holding a drink, and even writing, Sky News reports. The technique allows surgeons to apply nerve transfers to spinal cord injuries for the first time. "We didn'... More »

Old Spy Images Reveal Bad News for Himalayas

Scientists use them to calculate the melting of glaciers

(Newser) - Cold War era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to, the AP reports. The Asian mountain range, which includes Mount Everest, has been losing ice at a rate of about 1% a year since 2000,... More »

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