scientific study

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Laughing Gas May Ease Severe Depression
Small Study Suggests
Unusual Depression Treatment
new study

Small Study Suggests Unusual Depression Treatment

A pool of 24 people got relief after short treatments with laughing gas

(Newser) - Can laughing gas treat severe depression? Scientists are starting to ask that question, and the answer is looking like a promising maybe. In a small study —only 24 people, 96% of whom were white and 70% were women—nitrous oxide lifted the symptoms of treatment-resistant depression. A larger...

Arctic Sea Ice Is Melting Twice as Fast Now
Arctic Sea Ice
Is Melting Twice
as Fast Now
new study

Arctic Sea Ice Is Melting Twice as Fast Now

Cycle of rising temperatures, thinning ice worries researchers

(Newser) - The melting ice in the Arctic is part of a worrisome climate change loop, researchers say. Global temperatures are rising, which causes more Arctic ice to melt, which exposes more dark water to the sun, which raises global temperatures. In fact, the Guardian reports, sea ice in much of the...

Tiger Sharks Are Pretty Brave During Hurricanes
Tiger Sharks
Are Pretty
Brave During
Hurricanes
new study

Tiger Sharks Are Pretty Brave During Hurricanes

Other species flee, but one species seems to see opportunity

(Newser) - Researchers have found before that smaller types of sharks flee shallow water as a hurricane approaches. But it looks like one response doesn't fit all large sharks, a study published in Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science indicates. Tiger sharks didn't go anywhere as Hurricane Mathew neared the Bahamas...

A Labrador Test Instead of a Lab Test For COVID-19

Researchers are having good luck training dogs to sniff out the coronavirus

(Newser) - Quick—which would you prefer? A close encounter with a friendly pooch, or a cotton swab up your nose? Researchers have found that dogs trained to sniff out the virus that causes COVID-19 are pretty accurate and extremely fast, Reuters reports. It takes just 2 months or so to train...

Here's Another Way Sugary Sodas May Be Bad for You
Here's Another Way Sugary
Sodas May Be Bad for You
NEW STUDY

Here's Another Way Sugary Sodas May Be Bad for You

Study suggests link with early onset colorectal cancer in women

(Newser) - Can a daily sugary drink raise the risk of cancer? A new study in the journal Gut suggests the possibility. Researchers say women in an ongoing study were twice as likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer before 50 if they drank about a pint of sugary drinks every day,...

Study: Here's Why People Cheat, and What Happens

495 cheaters explain what made them cheat and what their affair was like

(Newser) - Why do people cheat and what does that affair look like? Scientific American reports a recent study came up with some pretty fascinating answers. Researchers turned to an unnamed US university and Reddit boards focused on relationships to recruit 495 people who copped to cheating. In a study published in...

They Killed the Rats of 'Rat Island,' With Unexpected Results

Study finds the full ecosystem has fully recovered

(Newser) - The name "Rat Island" has persisted for decades, but it 2012 it was officially done away with , and for good reason. The rats are gone. Popular Science dives into how that came to be and what the longer-term results have been via a March study published in Nature Scientific ...

It Killed the Dinosaurs, but Then It Gave Birth to Something Else

You can thank the Chicxulub impact for our modern rainforests: study

(Newser) - We owe a lot to the asteroid impact that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. For one thing, it gave us the lush tropical rainforests that help keep our planet healthy. That's according to a first-of-its-kind study published Friday in Science that looks at the effects of the...

On an Isolated Island Beach, Researchers Find Superbug

Researchers suspect global warming has helped organism jump to humans

(Newser) - For the first time, a drug-resistant hospital superbug has been found in the wild—on an isolated beach in the Andaman Islands. The organism has been in hospitals for about a decade, but its origin remains "a medical mystery," said Dr. Arturo Casadevall of Johns Hopkins, who wrote...

They Correctly Answered Math Problems—in Midst of a Dream

Small-scale study suggests 2-way communication with lucid dreamers

(Newser) - If you've encountered a sleep walker, you probably understand that some communication with a dreamer is possible. But a new study , encompassing four independent experiments, reveals lucid dreamers can not only communicate with the outside world while snoozing but also answer yes-or-no questions and simple math problems. This is...

A Flickering Heart Doesn't Mean You're Alive
A Flickering Heart
Doesn't Mean
You're Alive
NEW STUDY

A Flickering Heart Doesn't Mean You're Alive

In one case, cardiac activity was observed more than 4 minutes after pulse was lost

(Newser) - There can be no question that a person has died and still, their heart may flicker. That's one takeaway from a new study analyzing the final moments of 631 patients taken off life support in Canada, the UK, and the Czech Republic. Researchers were particularly interested to learn "...

'Brain-Eating Amoeba' Is Moving Northward
'Brain-Eating Amoeba'
Is on the Move
new study

'Brain-Eating Amoeba' Is on the Move

Climate change may be to blame

(Newser) - Climate change may have sparked a disturbing migration. A new study says infections tied to Naegleria fowleri—or "brain-eating amoeba"—are occurring farther north than they once did, LiveScience reports. The single-celled organism is typically found in warm bodies of freshwater, per Newsweek , making it historically more common...

An Ancient Light Could Undermine Physics
An Ancient Light Could
Undermine Physics
new study

An Ancient Light Could Undermine Physics

'If it were real, it's big'

(Newser) - There's an ancient light drifting across the universe that might just undermine particle physics as we know it, Science Alert reports. Scientists analyzing the cosmic microwave background—a faint remnant of the Big Bang—say they've spotted a twist in its light that could force a rethink beyond...

Engineers Have a New Inspiration: This Beetle
'Super Tough' Beetle Could
Inspire Us to Do Better
new study

'Super Tough' Beetle Could Inspire Us to Do Better

Researchers say the bug's crush-resistant shell can be a model for planes and buildings

(Newser) - It's a beetle that can withstand bird pecks, animal stomps and even being rolled over by a Toyota Camry. Now scientists are studying what the bug's crush-resistant shell could teach them about designing stronger planes and buildings, the AP reports. "This beetle is super tough," said...

Exploding Star Likely Wrecked Life on Earth
Scientists Find New Cause
of Mass Extinction Event
study says

Scientists Find New Cause of Mass Extinction Event

University of Illinois researchers point to possible supernovas

(Newser) - A mass extinction event that struck Earth 359 million years ago still has scientists scratching their heads. Was it volcano eruptions? Meteorites? Gamma-ray bursts? A new paper looks at another possible culprit: exploding stars. Researchers at the University of Illinois argue that evidence hidden in rocks coincides with the effect...

Dinosaur Gets Diagnosed About 76M Years Later
Dinosaur Gets Diagnosed
About 76M Years Later
new study

Dinosaur Gets Diagnosed About 76M Years Later

A 'Centrosaurus apertus' was stricken with advanced cancer

(Newser) - A dinosaur that hobbled around some 76 million years ago has finally been diagnosed—with cancer, New Atlas reports. Researchers in Canada spotted a large growth in a Centrosaurus apertus leg bone and ran it through a battery of tests, making CT scans, constructing a cross-section, and cutting it into...

This Is Actually a Map —the Biggest One Ever
This Is Actually a Map
—the Biggest One Ever
new study

This Is Actually a Map —the Biggest One Ever

This view of the universe also looks incredible

(Newser) - Want to get away? Now you can see how far "away" really is. Drawing on 20 years of research, scientists have created a 3D map of the universe that spans 11 billion years and covers more than 2 million quasars and galaxies—while shedding light on a couple of...

Native Americans Met Another People in 1200AD
Native Americans Met
Another People in 1200AD
new study

Native Americans Met Another People in 1200AD

Indigenous Americans and Polynesians met and procreated, study says

(Newser) - Thousands of miles apart, with shared DNA—they definitely met somewhere. That's the conclusion of a new study into Indigenous Americans and Polynesians who apparently bridged the oceanic gap between them and procreated some 800 years ago, the Guardian reports. "These findings change our understanding of one of...

Scientists Learn How 'Snot Palaces' Are Made
Scientists Turn Up
Stunning 'Snot Palaces'
new study

Scientists Turn Up Stunning 'Snot Palaces'

They do more with 4 inches than you'd expect

(Newser) - Master builders of the sea construct the equivalent of a complex five-story house that protects them from predators and funnels and filters food for them—all from snot coming out of their heads. And when these delicate mucus homes get clogged, the tadpole-looking critters—called giant larvaceans—build a new...

Mystery Solved: Why These Frogs Have See-Through Skin

Glass frog's translucent legs help it hide from predators

(Newser) - Scientists say they finally understand why the glass frog has see-through skin: it's camouflage—just not in the way most other tree frogs do it. An international team of scientists wondered why the glass frogs found in Central and South America have partially translucent skin—with intestines and a...

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