X

Mystery of Our First Interstellar Visitor Solved

Oumuamua was a comet, not an asteroid, scientists say
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Jun 27, 2018 3:20 PM CDT
This artist's rendering provided by the European Southern Observatory shows the interstellar object named "Oumuamua" which was discovered on Oct. 19, 2017 by the Pan-STARRS 1 telescope in Hawaii.   (M. Kornmesser/European Southern Observatory via AP)

(Newser) – Last year's visitor from another star system—a cigar-shaped object briefly tumbling through our cosmic neck of the woods—has now been identified as a comet. A European-led team makes the case in Wednesday's edition of the journal Nature, the AP reports. Telescopes first spotted the mysterious red-tinged object last October as it zipped through the inner solar system. Since then, astronomers have flip-flopped between comet and asteroid for our first confirmed interstellar guest. Neither a coma nor tail was spotted, hallmarks of an icy comet. But Italian astronomer Marco Micheli and his team reported that the object's path and acceleration are best explained not just by gravity, but also gases shedding from a comet.

The release of what's believed to be gaseous carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water applied only a tiny force on the object known as Oumuamua—about 1,000 times smaller than the effect of the sun's gravity—and barely altered its path, the researchers said. But the team's measurements "were so precise that we could actually see the change in position caused by the outgassing," said co-author Paul Chodas, manager of NASA's Center for Near-Earth Object Studies at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Discovered by a telescope in Hawaii, Oumuamua is Hawaiian for messenger from afar arriving first, or scout. It's long gone, as are the chances of knowing conclusively what it was.

(Read more Oumuamua stories.)

My Take on This Story
Show results  |  
5%
75%
1%
13%
2%
5%