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A Volcano Reawakens, Leaving Locals 'Traumatized'

Indonesia's Anak Krakatau, which spurred deadly 2018 tsunami in the Krakatoa crater, has erupted
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 11, 2020 7:30 AM CDT

(Newser) – In December 2018, hundreds of people died when a section of the Anak Krakatau island volcano, located in Indonesia's Krakatoa crater, collapsed, setting off a deadly tsunami. Now, there's new activity from the volcano, with the longest eruption noted since the 2018 disaster. The AP reports that Anak Krakatau (or "Child of Krakatoa") started spitting out lava, ash, and smoke on Friday, continuing into Saturday morning. "This seems to be the strongest eruptive phase since the violent phreatomagmatic activity following the partial collapse of the volcano on 22 Dec 2018," notes VolcanoDiscovery. Per the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation, an initial eruption began just before 10pm Friday, lasting one minute and 12 seconds and sending ash and smoke nearly 700 feet high, the Jakarta Post reports.

Then, about a half-hour later, a 38-minute eruption sent up an ash column that stretched more than 1,600 feet high. A "level 2" alert (the second highest out of four) was in place Saturday, though no casualties had yet been reported. Some pictures of the eruption circulated online. Residents along the southern Lampung coastline self-evacuated, mainly because they remain spooked from the 2018 tsunami. "They immediately fled to the mountains as they were still traumatized," one South Lampung resident told local media, per the Post. Police and service members remained on alert in Lampung province in case more evacuations were needed, but an official from the country's National Disaster Mitigation Agency says the volcanic activity had stopped as of Saturday and that "residents were advised not to panic." (Read more volcano eruption stories.)

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