science

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Ticks Collected From a Cave in Kenya Break Records

In a lab setting, this tick species revealed several amazing adaptations

(Newser) - Back in 1976, entomologist Julian Shepherd received a delightful gift: 13 ticks. Specifically, they were Argas brumpti, a species of large argasid (soft-shelled) ticks native to dry regions of southern and eastern Africa; these had been collected from caves near Nairobi. Shepherd, an associate professor of biological sciences at Binghamton...

Scientists Take Issue With Joe Rogan Podcast Discussion

Experts label climate comments by guest Jordan Peterson as dangerous nonsense

(Newser) - More critics are accusing the Spotify-exclusive Joe Rogan Experience podcast of sharing dangerous misinformation after Tuesday's episode in which a guest spouted what one scientist calls a "word salad of nonsense" about climate science. Just days after 270 members of the US scientific and medical communities demanded Spotify...

Nobel Chief Rules Out Quotas for Gender

'In the end, we will give the prize to those who are found the most worthy'

(Newser) - Just one of this year's 13 Nobel Prize winners was a woman, but the head of the academy that awards the prizes in science has ruled out bringing in quotas to even the balance. Since 1901, only 59 Nobel Prizes—6.2% of the total—have gone to women....

White House: We Need an AI Bill of Rights

Biden administration seeks plan to protect from faulty, harmful uses

(Newser) - Top science advisers to President Biden are calling for a new “bill of rights" to guard against powerful new artificial intelligence technology. The White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy on Friday launched a fact-finding mission to look at facial recognition and other biometric tools used to...

Japanese Macaque Shatters Monkey Glass Ceiling

Yakei, 9, bested her group's alpha and now gets to eat peanuts first

(Newser) - A monkey in Japan got first crack at some peanuts and made history. Yakei, a female macaque monkey at the Takasakiyama Natural Zoological Garden on Kyushu, is the alpha of a troop of 677 monkeys. When her troop let her eat peanuts put out by keepers at the park, it...

Is a Neanderthal's Carving the Oldest Art in the World?

Researchers say the bone fragment shows capacity for symbolism

(Newser) - A tiny object with no practical use has researchers all worked up. It’s a fragment of bone 2 inches long with deep marks carved into it found in a Neanderthal cave, and it might be the world’s oldest piece of art. The bone, thought to be 51,000...

'Explosive Diarrhea' Outbreak Halts Slip 'N Slide Show

NBC pauses production after area near set tests positive for giardia

(Newser) - Here are two ideas you'd want to be as far apart as possible: Slip 'N Slide and explosive diarrhea. And in the interest of keeping one away from the other, NBC shut down production on Ultimate Slip 'N Slide, a summer game show featuring a water...

A Labrador Test Instead of a Lab Test For COVID-19

Researchers are having good luck training dogs to sniff out the coronavirus

(Newser) - Quick—which would you prefer? A close encounter with a friendly pooch, or a cotton swab up your nose? Researchers have found that dogs trained to sniff out the virus that causes COVID-19 are pretty accurate and extremely fast, Reuters reports. It takes just 2 months or so to train...

Mystery of Florida Airport Monkeys Has Been Solved

Colony near Fort Lauderdale airport descended from primates captured for medical research

(Newser) - This is what happily ever after looks like. For a monkey, anyway. About 70 years ago, a colony of monkeys showed up near the Fort Lauderdale airport, in a mostly urban area with a small forest wedged into it. They’re friendly, if you call stealing your snacks from...

Here's Another Way Sugary Sodas May Be Bad for You
Here's Another Way Sugary
Sodas May Be Bad for You
NEW STUDY

Here's Another Way Sugary Sodas May Be Bad for You

Study suggests link with early onset colorectal cancer in women

(Newser) - Can a daily sugary drink raise the risk of cancer? A new study in the journal Gut suggests the possibility. Researchers say women in an ongoing study were twice as likely to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer before 50 if they drank about a pint of sugary drinks every day,...

In the Name of Science, Biden to Bring a Big WH First

Eric Lander will be Joe Biden's science adviser, and it'll be a Cabinet-level position

(Newser) - President-elect Joe Biden says "science will always be at the forefront of my administration," and he's elevating the post of science adviser to Cabinet level, a White House first. Biden, who planned to introduce his team Saturday, said the scientists "will ensure everything we do is...

'Brain-Eating Amoeba' Is Moving Northward
'Brain-Eating Amoeba'
Is on the Move
new study

'Brain-Eating Amoeba' Is on the Move

Climate change may be to blame

(Newser) - Climate change may have sparked a disturbing migration. A new study says infections tied to Naegleria fowleri—or "brain-eating amoeba"—are occurring farther north than they once did, LiveScience reports. The single-celled organism is typically found in warm bodies of freshwater, per Newsweek , making it historically more common...

An Ancient Light Could Undermine Physics
An Ancient Light Could
Undermine Physics
new study

An Ancient Light Could Undermine Physics

'If it were real, it's big'

(Newser) - There's an ancient light drifting across the universe that might just undermine particle physics as we know it, Science Alert reports. Scientists analyzing the cosmic microwave background—a faint remnant of the Big Bang—say they've spotted a twist in its light that could force a rethink beyond...

Neanderthal Thumbs Weren't Quite the Same as Ours
We Don't Use Our Thumbs
the Way Neanderthals Did
NEW STUDY

We Don't Use Our Thumbs the Way Neanderthals Did

Fossils suggest they regularly gripped handled tools

(Newser) - If you happen to travel back in time and encounter an angry Neanderthal, be sure to request a thumb war, rather than a full-blown one. According to new research, Neanderthals' hands were different than our own, with a thumb that stuck out at a wider angle than what you see...

Fastest Event Ever Recorded Took 247 'Zeptoseconds'

Scientists clocked a photon moving across a molecule

(Newser) - It's shorter than a millisecond, shorter than a nanosecond, and even shorter than summers seem when you're a kid—it's the zeptosecond, the unit scientists used to measure the shortest interval of time ever recorded. A zeptosecond is a trillionth of a billionth of a second, or...

Mathematician Snags Richest Prize for His 'Alien' Equations

Martin Hairer among those to get $3M a 'Breakthrough' award

(Newser) - A researcher once said that a theory related to a branch of math dealing with random processes was so impressive, it must have come from aliens . It was actually the work of Martin Hairer, who has now been awarded the richest prize in academia, reports the Guardian . Hairer was named...

Physicist: Here's How the Universe Could End
Physicist: The Universe
Could Easily End This Way
study says

Physicist: The Universe Could Easily End This Way

Matt Caplan sees a last flurry of explosions

(Newser) - Flash forward trillions of years, and the universe is expected to be a dark, cold, lonely place—but how will it end? A new paper predicts a last flurry of explosions before our known world goes totally black, ScienceAlert reports. "Galaxies will have dispersed, black holes will have evaporated,...

The Moon's Lava Tubes Can Fit Entire Cities
The Moon's Lava Tubes
Might Fit Entire Cities
new study

The Moon's Lava Tubes Might Fit Entire Cities

Imagine a tunnel that fits Dubai's Burj Khalifa. Now that's big.

(Newser) - Looks like Mars and the moon contain huge lava tubes that offer protection from solar radiation and meteors—which makes them possible homes for future explorers, LiveScience reports. A new paper says Martian tunnels appear to range from 130 to 1,300 feet in diameter, while the moon's are...

Teen Wins $250K for Malnutrition- Busting Tool

Inspired by her 3 siblings and an Ethiopian drought, Lillian Peterson aces Regeneron science contest

(Newser) - A high school senior in New Mexico has a bright future in STEM—and it just got much brighter with the announcement she beat out 40 other finalists to win a prestigious science and math competition. NPR reports that 17-year-old Lillian Kay Petersen of Los Alamos has taken home the...

This Is Actually a Map —the Biggest One Ever
This Is Actually a Map
—the Biggest One Ever
new study

This Is Actually a Map —the Biggest One Ever

This view of the universe also looks incredible

(Newser) - Want to get away? Now you can see how far "away" really is. Drawing on 20 years of research, scientists have created a 3D map of the universe that spans 11 billion years and covers more than 2 million quasars and galaxies—while shedding light on a couple of...

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