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So How'd Mueller Do? Here Are 10 Takes

Reaction following his testimony before the House Judiciary Committee
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Jul 24, 2019 11:54 AM CDT
Updated Jul 24, 2019 2:55 PM CDT
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Former special counsel Robert Mueller listens as he testifies before the House Judiciary Committee hearing on his report on Russian election interference, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, July 24, 2019 in Washington.   (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

(Newser) – It was a long day but Robert Mueller is done. He wrapped up his testimony before the House Intelligence Committee at 3:30pm ET, having kicked the day off at 8:30am before the House Judiciary Committee. So how'd he do? President Trump seemed pleased with the day's events, tweeting, "TRUTH IS A FORCE OF NATURE!" Here's how Mueller's appearances are being received by others:

  1. Fox News' Chris Wallace was more than unimpressed. In comments made during a break in the testimony (and quoted by President Trump), he had this to say, per the Daily Beast. "This has been a disaster for the Democrats and I think it's been a disaster for the reputation of Robert Mueller. ... He has been attacked a number of times and you would think that almost anybody else would have defended his own integrity and the integrity of the investigation and over and over Mueller just sits silent and allows the attacks from the Republicans to sweep over him and says nothing."
  2. At Vice, Jason Koebler is one of many calling out Mueller's frequent halts, though he blames technology. The hearing "quickly devolved into the world's most boring pop quiz," he writes. "We should not have to watch as he asks lawmakers for a page number, flip back and forth through his papers, and finds what they’re referring to." And for that Koebler faults the "Justice Department's PDF and Congress's outdated rules about using technology during hearings."
  3. Aaron Blake offers a number of takeaways at the Washington Post. He leads with this one: That Republicans were trying to "undermine" the report by "tripping up" Mueller—and were effective in doing so. Blake points out a number of instances where this was the case. Among them: when Rep. Collins asked whether "collusion" and "conspiracy" are "colloquially" the same. Mueller said no; Collins then read the report's line about them being "largely synonymous." Blake argues that's a shade different from "colloquially the same," but writes that "Mueller didn't seem to have much of an answer."

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