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Ban on Irish Butter Sparks Fight in Butter-Loving Wisconsin

Selling the ungraded butter is punishable by jail time
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Mar 18, 2017 11:44 AM CDT

(Newser) – Wisconsin resident Jean Smith snatches up entire stocks of her beloved Kerrygold Irish butter from stores when visiting family in Nebraska, thanks to an antiquated law in her dairy-obsessed state that bans it and any other butter that hasn't been graded for quality. "We bring back 20 bricks or so," Smith tells the AP, noting she plops a tablespoon of the Ireland-made butter into her tea each morning. "It's creamier, it doesn't have any waxy taste and it's a richer yellow." Tired of trekking across state lines to stock up, she and a handful of other Wisconsin butter aficionados filed a lawsuit this week challenging the law, saying local consumers and businesses "are more than capable of determining whether butter is sufficiently creamy, properly salted, or too crumbly." No government help needed, they say.

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On the books since 1953, the law is strict: It requires butters to be rated on various measures—including flavor, body and color—by the federal government or people licensed by the state as butter and cheese graders. Anybody convicted of selling unlabeled or ungraded butter is subject to a fine between $100 and $1,000 and six months in jail. Wisconsin is the only state in the nation with such a stringent butter provision, which the lawsuit argues amounts to an unconstitutional "government-mandated 'taste test.'" The Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, a conservative legal group representing the plaintiffs, said the grading process is subjective and doesn't protect consumers. The real issue, the group argues, is personal freedom. (Read more butter stories.)

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