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More Bad News for Nissan's Already Jailed Ex-Chief

Carlos Ghosn hit with fresh allegations of 'breach of trust' regarding financial investment that tanked
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 21, 2018 8:32 AM CST
In this May 12, 2016, photo, then-Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn speaks during a joint press conference with Mitsubishi Motors Corp. in Yokohama, near Tokyo.   (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

(Newser) – Things just went from bad to worse for the ex-head of Nissan. Already facing charges that he'd underreported his income while heading up the car company, Carlos Ghosn was arrested again Friday, while in jail in Tokyo, amid fresh allegations of a possible "breach of trust" regarding a financial investment from 10 years ago, reports the New York Times. Specifically, Ghosn is accused of moving to Nissan a personal derivative contract that had been hit with upward of $16 million in losses. CNN notes the new arrest dashed the hopes of getting out of jail for Ghosn, who'd just heard from a Tokyo court Thursday that prosecutors couldn't extend his detention on the underreporting charges; he'd hoped to get out from behind bars with bail before Christmas, but now that looks unlikely.

Ghosn, who's been in detention since Nov. 19, can now be held for two more days, plus up to 20 more if prosecutors win an extension. This long-term detention highlights "how awful the Japanese criminal justice system is," a Konan University law professor says. The Times also notes it's common for the same suspect to get arrested several times, with one former prosecutor saying he'd once arrested a suspect eight times. "Things as they stand are absolutely unacceptable," Ghosn told his attorney, reports NHK via the Guardian. Meanwhile, "Nissan's own investigation is ongoing, and its scope continues to broaden," the company said in a statement, per the Times. If charged and convicted on these new allegations, Ghosn could face up to 10 years in prison. (Nissan has its own "deepest regret.")

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