Site First Excavated in Early 1900s Gives Up New Find

Ruins of temple to Zeus have been unearthed in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Apr 26, 2022 1:21 PM CDT
Site First Excavated in Early 1900s Gives Up New Find
This undated photo provided by the Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Ministry on Monday, April 25, 2022, shows archeologists working in the ruins of a temple for Zeus, the ancient Greek god, at the Tell el-Farma archaeological site in the northwestern corner of the Sinai Peninsula.   (Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Ministry via AP)

(Newser) – Egyptian archaeologists unearthed the ruins of a temple for the ancient Greek god Zeus in the Sinai Peninsula, antiquities authorities said Monday. The Tourism and Antiquities Ministry said in a statement the temple ruins were found in the Tell el-Farma archaeological site (its ancient name is Pelusium) in northwestern Sinai. Mostafa Waziri, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, said archaeologists excavated the temple ruins through its entrance gate, where two huge fallen granite columns were visible. The gate was destroyed in a powerful earthquake in ancient times, he said.

Waziri said the ruins were found between the Pelusium Fort and a memorial church at the site. Archaeologists found a set of granite blocks probably used to build a staircase for worshipers to reach the temple. The AP reports excavations at the area date back to early 1900 when French Egyptologist Jean Clédat found ancient Greek inscriptions that showed the existence of the Zeus-Kasios temple but he didn’t unearth it, according to the ministry.

Zeus-Kasios is a conflation of Zeus, the God of the sky in ancient Greek mythology, and Mount Kasios in Syria, where Zeus once worshipped. Hisham Hussein, the director of Sinai archaeological sites, said inscriptions found in the area show that Roman Emperor Hadrian (117-138) renovated the temple. He said experts will study the unearthed blocks and do a photogrammetry survey to help determine the architectural design of the temple. The temple ruins are the latest in a series of ancient discoveries Egypt has touted in the past couple of years in the hope of attracting more tourists. (Read more discoveries stories.)

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