X

4 North Dakota Murders Were Planned, Say Police

Gun and knife were cleaned with bleach afterward, court filings say
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Apr 6, 2019 8:46 AM CDT
State and local police search a field Wednesday in Manton, N.D., about half a mile from a business where an owner and three employees were found dead.   (AP Photo/ Blake Nicholson)
camera-icon View 2 more images

(Newser) – A North Dakota man charged Friday with killing four people at a business that manages the mobile home park where he lives tried to avoid detection by picking up shell casings, changing his clothing, and cleaning a knife and gun with bleach, according to court documents. Court documents allege that after shooting and stabbing the victims, Chad Isaak, 44, took one of the company's vehicles to drive about one block, then walked to his own truck parked less than a mile away at a McDonald's, per the AP. Authorities traced his steps with help from surveillance video at businesses along the route, the documents say. The affidavit and complaint filed Friday offer the most details yet on a mystery that has gripped the area since authorities found the bodies of four people Monday at RJR Maintenance and Management in Mandan, a town of 22,000 near the capital of Bismarck.

A judge set bond for Isaak at $1 million after a hearing where Morton County Assistant State's Attorney Gabrielle Goter argued that the killings "show a level of preplanning and a level of intent to disguise his actions" that suggested that witnesses could be at risk if he is freed. "It appears that RJR was targeted," said Goter. Isaak's attorney requested $100,000 cash bond, citing "zero criminal history." Isaak, a chiropractor and Navy veteran, faces four counts of murder and other charges. The victims were RJR co-owner Robert Fakler, 52; employee Adam Fuehrer, 42; and married co-workers Lois Cobb, 45, and William Cobb, 50. Fakler had multiple stab wounds. Isaak appeared in court Friday in a black-and-white striped jail uniform and showed no emotion. He spoke only to say, "Yes, sir," when the judge asked him whether he understood the charges.

(Read more North Dakota stories.)

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
9%
13%
27%
1%
47%
3%