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This State Just Legalized Composting of Humans

Washington is first to legalize alternative to burial, cremation
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted May 22, 2019 4:17 AM CDT
Katrina Spade, upper left, the founder and CEO of Recompose, a company that hopes to use composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains, looks on Tuesday, May 21, 2019, as Washington...   (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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(Newser) – Ashes to ashes, guts to dirt. Gov. Jay Inslee signed legislation Tuesday making Washington the first state to approve composting as an alternative to burying or cremating human remains. It allows licensed facilities to offer "natural organic reduction," which turns a body, mixed with substances such as wood chips and straw, into about two wheelbarrows' worth of soil in a span of several weeks, the AP reports. Loved ones are allowed to keep the soil to spread, just as they might spread the ashes of someone who has been cremated—or even use it to plant vegetables or a tree. State law previously dictated that remains be disposed of by burial or cremation.

"It gives meaning and use to what happens to our bodies after death," said Nora Menkin, executive director of the Seattle-based People's Memorial Association, which helps people plan for funerals. Supporters say the method is an environmentally friendly alternative to cremation, which releases carbon dioxide and particulates into the air, and conventional burial, in which people are drained of their blood, pumped full of formaldehyde and other chemicals that can pollute groundwater, and placed in a nearly indestructible coffin, taking up land. "That's a serious weight on the earth and the environment as your final farewell," said Sen. Jamie Pedersen, the Seattle Democrat who sponsored the measure.

(Read more Washington state stories.)

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