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'Biggest Environmental Story That No One Knows About'

West Coast groundfish are back on the menu
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Dec 26, 2019 3:23 AM CST
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In this Dec. 11, 2019 photo, Kevin Dunn, a trawler who fishes for groundfish, stands next to his boat as he speaks on the phone with a fish processor at the docks in Warrenton, Oregon.   (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
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(Newser) – A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the West Coast. After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen—those who use nets to catch rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch, and other deep-dwelling fish—are making a comeback here, reinventing themselves as a sustainable industry less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean because of the species' depletion, the AP reports. The ban devastated fishermen, but on Jan. 1, regulators will reopen an area roughly three times the size of Rhode Island off Oregon and California to groundfish bottom trawling—all with the approval of environmental groups that were once the industry's biggest foes.

The rapid turnaround is made even more unique by the collaboration between the fishermen and environmentalists who spent years refining a long-term fishing plan that will continue to resuscitate the groundfish industry while permanently protecting thousands of square miles of reefs and coral beds that benefit the overfished species. Now, the fishermen who see their livelihood returning must solve another piece of the puzzle: drumming up consumer demand for fish that haven't been in grocery stores or on menus for a generation. "It's really a conservation home run," says Shems Jud, regional director for the Environmental Defense Fund's ocean program. "The recovery is decades ahead of schedule. It's the biggest environmental story that no one knows about."

(Read more fishery stories.)

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