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And Now, the Democratic Candidates Will Start Falling

'Multiple dropouts' expected within weeks: Politico
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 27, 2019 11:10 AM CDT
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Sen. Cory Booker, D-NJ, second from left, hugs Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., hugs former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro at the end of Wednesday's Democratic primary debate. In between them is New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio.   (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

(Newser) – Expect Democratic presidential candidates to start throwing in the towel within weeks, perhaps with the release of second-quarter fundraising results on July 15. That's the prediction of Politico, which reports that—seven months before Democratic caucuses and primaries begin—it's "getting very late" for candidates to make an impression. To take part in a third debate in September, to follow another in late July, candidates will need donations from at least 130,000 individuals and support of 2% or higher in four polls. "At the moment, fewer than 10 candidates would likely qualify," reports Politico. With "the demands of raising money, and the embarrassment factor of proud and accomplished people waging what are going to look like increasingly futile efforts, history suggests there will be multiple dropouts before the close of summer."

Denver's Maggie Banks looks forward to that development. "Some people will be weeded out as we go along, and I want that to happen so I can look at everybody's ideals and experience," the 32-year-old mother tells Fortune, which suggests the crowded field of candidates is overwhelming voters. Prior to Wednesday's debate, Fortune named the front-runners as Joe Biden, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, and Pete Buttigieg. But Politico reports only Warren and Buttigieg "can convincingly claim to have improved their relative position in polls, coverage, and activist energy" over months of campaigning. A recent poll showed 11 of 24 candidates (Joe Sestak has since jumped in, making it 25) were unknown by 50% of 400 respondents, while 40% actively hoped New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio would drop out of the race, reports the Washington Post. (Get to know some of the candidates here.)

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