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Aspirin Advice for Seniors Is Changing

Suggestion to take daily dose to prevent first heart attack is getting shelved
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Oct 12, 2021 12:55 PM CDT
Aspirin Advice for Seniors Is Changing
According to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's preliminary updated advice released on Tuesday, older adults without heart disease shouldn't take daily aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke.   (AP Photo/Emma H. Tobin)

(Newser) – Older adults without heart disease shouldn't take daily low-dose aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke, an influential health guidelines group said in preliminary advice released Tuesday. Bleeding risks for adults in their 60s and up who haven't had a heart attack or stroke outweigh any potential benefits from aspirin, the US Preventive Services Task Force said in its draft guidance, per the AP. For the first time, however, the panel said there may be a small benefit for adults in their 40s who have no bleeding risks. For those in their 50s, the panel softened advice and said evidence of benefit is less clear.

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The recommendations are meant for people with high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, or other conditions that increase their chances for a heart attack or stroke. Regardless of age, adults should talk with their doctors about stopping or starting aspirin to make sure it’s the right choice for them, said task force member Dr. John Wong of Tufts Medical Center. “Aspirin use can cause serious harms, and risk increases with age,’’ he said. If finalized, the advice for older adults would backtrack on recommendations the panel issued in 2016 for helping prevent a first heart attack and stroke, but it would be in line with more recent guidelines from other medical groups.

Doctors have long recommended daily low-dose aspirin for many patients who already have had a heart attack or stroke. The task force guidance does not change that advice. The task force previously said a daily aspirin might also protect against colorectal cancer for some adults in their 50s and 60s, but the updated guidance says more evidence of any benefit is needed. The guidance will now be subject to public comments until Nov. 8. The group will evaluate that input and then make a final decision. (Read more medical research stories.)

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