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Kavanaugh's Accuser Is Willing to Testify Before Senate

GOP senator Jeff Flake says she should be heard before a vote takes place
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Sep 17, 2018 6:55 AM CDT
Sen. Jeff Flake listens as Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee.   (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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(Newser) – Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court no longer appears to be a sure thing. After detailed accusations from a woman who says Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were both teenagers were published Sunday, Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee said he was "not comfortable" voting to advance the nomination until more is heard from the woman, Politico reports. "We need to hear from her," Flake said of Christine Blasey Ford. "And I don't think I'm alone in this." Sen. Lindsey Graham, another Republican on the committee, also said Sunday that Ford should be heard by the committee, if that is what she wants. Ford's lawyer told CNN on Monday that her client is willing to testify before the committee. "The answer is yes," Debra Katz says. Responded White House rep Kellyanne Conway: "She should be heard."

A vote is scheduled for Thursday. Republicans have an 11 to 10 majority on the committee, meaning that if Flake won't vote to advance the nomination, it will be stalled unless a Democrat votes in favor. Sen. Bob Corker, a Republican not on the committee, has also called for a delay in the wake of the accusations, which Kavanaugh has denied. Republicans had hoped to have Kavanaugh confirmed by Oct. 1, but Senate Democrats say a delay in voting is now essential, the Washington Post reports. "To railroad a vote now would be an insult to the women of America and the integrity of the Supreme Court," Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement. But a source tells the AP that most Senate Republicans—and the White House—see no need to postpone the vote. (Read more Brett Kavanaugh stories.)

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