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Sirhan Sirhan Moves Big Step Toward Freedom

Parole board votes to free RFK's assassin, but governor will have the final say
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Aug 27, 2021 8:26 PM CDT
RFK's Assassin Moves Big Step Toward Freedom
In this May 9, 1968 file photo, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy speaks to the delegates of the United Auto Workers at a convention hall in Atlantic City, N.J.   (AP Photo, File)

(Newser) – California’s parole board voted Friday to free Robert F. Kennedy’s assassin after two of RFK’s sons said they supported releasing him and prosecutors declined to argue he should be kept behind bars. But the governor ultimately will decide if Sirhan Sirhan leaves prison, per the AP. Douglas Kennedy, who was a toddler when his father was gunned down in 1968, told a two-person board panel that he was moved to tears by Sirhan’s remorse and that the 77-year-old should be released if he’s not a threat to others. “I’m overwhelmed just by being able to view Mr. Sirhan face to face,” he said. “I’ve lived my life both in fear of him and his name in one way or another. And I am grateful today to see him as a human being worthy of compassion and love.”

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Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who has spoken in favor of his release in the past wrote in favor of paroling Sirhan. He said in the letter that he met him in prison and was moved by Sirhan “who wept, clinching my hands and asked for forgiveness.” “While nobody can speak definitively on behalf of my father, I firmly believe that based on his own consuming commitment to fairness and justice, that he would strongly encourage this board to release Mr. Sirhan because of Sirhan’s impressive record of rehabilitation,” he said in a letter submitted during the hearing to the board.

Sirhan, whose hair is now white, smiled, thanked the board, and gave a thumbs-up after the decision to grant parole was announced. It was a major victory in his 16th attempt at parole after he’s served 53 years. But it does not assure his release. The ruling will be reviewed over the next 120 days by the board’s staff. Then it will be sent to the governor, who will have 30 days to decide whether to grant it, reverse it or modify it. If Sirhan is freed, he must live in a transitional home for six months, enroll in an alcohol abuse program, and get therapy.

(Read more Sirhan Sirhan stories.)

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