X

Jane Fonda Just Made It In. So Did Sonia Sotomayor

Check out who else is about to be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Mar 9, 2019 5:30 AM CST
This photo shows Col. Nicole Malachowski, the first woman to fly for the Air Force's elite Thunderbirds team and went on to serve as an adviser to former first lady Michelle Obama.   (Courtesy of National Women's Hall of Fame Class via AP)
camera-icon View 9 more images

(Newser) – Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, actress Jane Fonda, and attorney Gloria Allred are being inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame. They're among 10 members of the Class of 2019, announced Friday, per the AP. The other honorees include civil rights activist Angela Davis; Native American lawyer Sarah Deer; retired Air Force fighter pilot Nicole Malachowski; the late suffragist and cartoonist Rose O'Neill; New York Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, who died last year; composer Laurie Spiegel; and AIDS researcher Flossie Wong-Staal. "We are pleased to add these American women to the ranks of inductees whose leadership and achievements have changed the course of American history," Hall of Fame President Betty Bayer said.

Actress, author, and political activist Jane Fonda has received Academy Awards, Golden Globes, a Primetime Emmy, and the AFI Life Achievement Award. Her anti-war activism in the 1970s stirs debate and demonstrators to this day. Gloria Allred has represented women in numerous high-profile and celebrity cases (including several women currently accusing singer R. Kelly of sexual abuse), while Sonia Sotomayor is the third woman and first Latina justice to serve on the Supreme Court. The eight living and two deceased honorees will join 276 other women who've been inducted to date, including suffragists, sports and political figures, authors, and entertainers. Those honored are nominated by the public and judged by a team of experts across the various fields. The formal induction ceremony will take place in September outside Seneca Falls, the upstate New York city considered the birthplace of women's rights where the hall is located. (Read more women stories.)

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
3%
6%
5%
35%
2%
48%